Marti's Theory

Archive for January 2017

Well, it’s been exactly one year since Glenn Frey, co-founder of Eagles and artist in his own right died at the age of 67.  This was the beginning of a year in which we lost so many talented artists, that a tongue-in-cheek campaign to “keep Betty White safe” popped up in December.

Some losses were more difficult than others.  The passing of David Bowie, for example, knocked me for a loop.

But for some reason, two “celebrity” deaths that bookended the year – Glenn Frey and Carrie Fisher – affected me the most.  The loss of Fisher was straightforward and easier to understand.  As I mentioned elsewhere on social media, while talking about her as an author: “She is so candid, funny, clever and SO relatable, reading her is like reminiscing with an old friend.”

But why I reacted so strongly to the passing of Glenn Frey was a little harder to understand.

A large part of it had to do simply with the Eagles’ body of work, both the span and where it fell in my own lifeline.  While watching the documentary History of the Eagles (for the fourth time, I might add), I realized: they supplied the theme songs of my entire twenties.  So it’s not just the great music, but also the memories.

In addition to that, both Glenn Frey and Don Henley had very successful solo careers for a number of years in there.  How many remember Frey from Miami Vice?  Too long ago? How about from Jerry McGuire?

And it’s not only a nostalgia thing.  Okay, FINE.  Nostalgia does have a role here.  You know … faded youth and all that.  But seriously, there’s more than that.  About four years ago I had the pleasure of attending a Glenn Frey concert on Maui and it was pure Glenn – playing what he wanted to play – from Tin Pan Alley to contemporary and back again.  He was joyful, right on the mark and obviously having a blast.  And adding to the mix, I was with new friends.  So memories have continued to be added to my subconsciously stored Glenn Frey Handbook.

Earlier I mentioned the documentary “History of the Eagles, Part 2” and that figures into it as well.  In the doc, everyone was pretty honest, sort of telling it like it was, from their perspective.  Nevertheless,  I noticed that Don Henley (who I also admire) was honest, yet more measured in his words.  More aware of the effect.  Frey, on the other hand, let it all hang out [notice the 70’s phrases dropped into this paragraph].  Imperfect but real.  And I think THAT is a big factor in where my simpactico is coming from.  In this crazy ‘through the looking glass’ mirror of the celebrity/fan world, I most appreciate those who allow us to glimpse who they really are.

If you’re still reading this, then you might enjoy the clip that I’ve linked below.  It’s a series of very short samples of Frey songs over the years, a musical amuse-bouche of sorts. But what struck me is the chronology of it – over 40 years of Glenn Frey in seven minutes.

Why am I posting something with such a limited niche appeal?  I guess I really wanted to talk about this, and the twenty-something students at my Ed Center are not likely to care or even know who I’d be talking about.  So if you’ve made it this far, then I thank you.

Here’s the link and btw – yes, I’ve also had a 45 year crush on him but I SWEAR, that’s beside the point.

 

 

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